$25 Amazon/PP-WW-Those Children Are Ours-David Burnett-Ends 11/1 | Miki's Hope

$25 Amazon/PP-WW-Those Children Are Ours-David Burnett-Ends 11/1

Monday, October 12, 2015


As usual David Burnett has written a beautiful novel that will grip you and make you think. Have you ever known anyone who is bi-polar? I have and in all honesty they can really confuse you. When they are on their meds all is well--when they are not--watch out! Alcoholism seems to go hand and hand with a person who is bi polar. You never know when they are going to snap at you or anyone else. It is genetic I believe and when you combine that with being abused as a child---well that is essentially what this story is about.

Jennie Bateman was an abused child-her father an undiagnosed bipolar personality. She ultimately got married and had two children--then one day--she left--just walked out. She finally gets help and with the help of medication is living a more normal life. She decides that she wants to see and friend her daughters after all these years.

Will she be able to--can her daughters ever forgive her? And what about her ex-husband with his fiance who he is going to marry. Can all of this turn out. There is a surprise ending here which I think you will really like! I highly suggest you read this novel!!


NEWLY RELEASED...

Jennie Bateman screamed at her daughters, cursed at her husband, packed a bag, and walked away. Twelve years later, she petitions the family court for visitation with her daughters, Alexis and Christa.

Her attorney tells Jennie that, ordinarily, she could not imagine that some type of visitation would not be granted. But, she warns, the situation is hardly ordinary.
True, Jennie suffered from a bipolar disorder when she began to drink heavily, abandoned her family, and moved in with another man. True, she has turned her life around: leaving her boyfriend, returning to school, entering therapy, taking medication, finding a job, and joining a church.

But she pressed no claim for her children when her husband divorced her, and she has made no attempt to contact them in any way since then. Her daughters, now sixteen and fourteen, live four hundred miles away. They have busy lives that do not include her, lives that will be totally disrupted by the visitation that she requests. Their father is engaged to be married to a woman who has taken the role of their mother for a decade. Alexis remembers nothing good about Jennie. Christa recalls nothing at all.

Conflict ensues as soon as Jennie’s petition is served: her former husband does not want to share his children with the woman who deserted him; her children have no interest in knowing the mother who abandoned them, and her father insists that she is being timid and ought to demand full custody, not simply visitation.

As court convenes, Jennie’s past is dredged up− the desertion, the men, her drinking, her mental health − and paraded before the judge. Her claim to be a different person, now, is attacked. The judge hesitates to grant Jennie’s request, but reluctantly agrees to order three trial visits.

If persuading the judge to let her see her children was difficult, convincing them to allow her to be a part of their lives seems to be almost impossible. What happens as she finally begins to connect with her daughters places them all in grave danger and threatens her life, itself.


Available to buy from....


About the author

David Burnett lives in Columbia South Carolina, with his wife and their blue-eyed cat, Bonnie. The Reunion, his first novel, is set in nearby Charleston.

David enjoys traveling, photography, baking bread, and the Carolina beaches.
He has photographed subjects as varied as prehistoric ruins on the islands of Scotland, star trails, sea gulls, a Native American powwow, and his grandson, Jack. David and his wife have traveled widely in the United States and the United Kingdom. During one trip to Scotland, they visited Crathes Castle, the ancestral home of the Burnett family near Aberdeen. In The Reunion, Michael's journey through England and Scotland allows him to sketch many places they have visited.

David has graduate degrees in psychology and education and previously was Director of Research for the South Carolina Department of Education. He and his wife have two daughters.


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I received this book to review through Beck Valley Books Book Tours, all the opinions above are 100% my own.


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34 comments :

Michelle Li said...

Children say the darndest things.

Evelyn said...

Children start talking about love and crush.

bxcrochet said...

It is amazing how many people are diagnosed with being bipolar. It sounds like a really interesting read.

Michelle F.

Ourfamilyworld said...

This sounds very interesting. While we hear many cases of diagnosed bipolar cases, I'm sure there is more that goes undiagnosed. I would love to read this book.

Cali Willette said...

Thanks for the giveaway! I think it's funny when kids talk like adults.

Christina Wagner said...

I think the funniest thing I've seen my boys do is when their cousins come to play they always make them the villains. It never fails no matter what they playing my sons always make sure they are the heroes and their cousins are the villains.

Sharon Martin said...

I finished read this one myself last night, thoroughly enjoyed the whole book as I have done with all his books.

Masshole Mommy said...

That sounds like a gripping read. I love that is helping to raise awareness about bipolar disorder.

Scott said...

It's weird, but every time I see the last name "Bateman", I can only picture Jason in my head. I guess with my last name, I'm used to people comparing to a TV version.

Sherry Compton said...

My grandson wrote, starred in, and directed a skit for his family. It was very funny!
savewish@yahoo.com

Kristen Campbell said...

Oh goodness! Sounds like this one could go either way - but if YOU say I'll like the ending, then I'll believe you!

Six Time Mommy TEST said...

This sounds like something I'd be interested in. I will have to check it out, I like books like this! - Jeanine

Amber N said...

I am definitely going to look into this.

Heather Jones said...

It sounds like a truly amazing read. I love stories of perseverence. Sometimes you think that a child can never overcome the tragedy that happens to them, but there are walking talking aduts out there that have. Sometimes the relationships you walked out on never can be resolved, but sometimes they can. It can be difficult when the feelings you have for a parent is grounded in a negative part of your life that you want to dismiss. Sounds like a great read.

Naomi said...

Sounds like an inspiring story! I'd love to read this story!

Michele said...

Cant wait to read this story you did a great review! Mental Health is a hard issue to deal with let alone throwing alcoholism on top and other issues I think it is great she wants to be a part of her childrens lives and has made positive changes.
Given the right resources anything can happen!

Claudette said...

OMG, you were describing a date of mine! He was bipolar and a recovering alcoholic! Suffice it to say, we didn't last very long! Maybe I will get this book for my winter read! :)

fee roberts said...

The funniest thing that my granddaughter did was start singing 'Let It Go' in the middle of Target and ended up with most of the people in the store coming over to listen. When she was done everyone clapped. And she says, "Thank you!" I busted out laughing.

Housewife Eclectic said...

This sounds absolutely delightful! I need to check it out!

Michelle Martinka said...

This sounds like a great read. As someone who is bipolar, I do fear losing control and am aware there is such a struggle and stigma associate with mental illness.

Deb PelletierC said...

When one of my friend's young son called me uncle Deb in a store. People turned to look at me. But we just giggled . ;-)

Crystal said...

That's a tough topic, but I'm sure it'd be an interesting read. I hope there is peace for all involved.

Liz Mays said...

I went ahead and put this one in my Amazon cart. It sounds great!

Farrah said...

I'm going to be buying this one! It really speaks to my heart as my best friend struggles with bipolar.

Huguette En said...

The funniest thing my son did was when he was about 4 years old. Every Christmas present was ah just what I wanted. Then he opened this crow, just what I wanted but he was so afraid of it.

bn100 said...

can't think of anything

- said...

Thank you so much fro reviewing my book!
David Burnett

Berkeley Hapa said...

My sister and her husband once came late to a Thanksgiving dinner because it was also my birthday. My nephew, probably 5 or 6 at the time wanted to go home immediately. My brother-in-law said they were staying awhile "because it was my special day." My nephew yelled "Well, I'm feeling very UNspecial!" My husband and I still crack up and use the "un-special" word 12 years later!

Irma Jurejevčič said...

Shaved a cat, lol. My friends son shaved their cat. How he manged to hold her... enigma :)

christy caldwell said...

http://www.amazon.com/David-Burnett/e/B0092SDNXM/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_7?qid=1421512560&sr=1-7
I did an oops. I hit enter before leaving my link on an entry.

Shannon said...

LOL one day Chris (my husband) and I were at our fave park by the lake. So there were a lot of ducks in the lake and they would chase each other. Chris starts humming Flight of the Valkyries and a little boy across the lake started doing it as well and Chris was so embarrassed LOL

Marthalynn said...

Wow, my kids have done some funny things, but why is it so hard to remember?! I should be better about documenting them because I obviously can't be counted on to retell the tales when they're older. My little one, when she was about 18 months old would dig through the laundry basket, get naked, and pull her daddy's socks on (they went all the way up her entire legs) and put her big brother's briefs on her head. She wasn't even trying to be funny, just another day for her!

Jennifer Leigh said...

Actually last weekend my boyfriend and I were out with his son and someone was telling us their life story as a prelude to asking for money that they seemingly didn't actually need. That aside, however, five-year-old Cameron interrupts the guy mid-spiel and asks, "Who ARE you?" I had to laugh. My thoughts exactly ;)

slehan said...

My friend's grandson seems to like having his shoes on the wrong feet and his clothes on backwards (except when he's running around naked).

slehan at juno dot com

 
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