Book + 11 tee shirts GA-The Intangibles-Monte Dutton-US-12/17 | Miki's Hope

Book + 11 tee shirts GA-The Intangibles-Monte Dutton-US-12/17

Tuesday, December 10, 2013


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I grew up in a small town and I can definitely attest to the fact that the high school sports teams were and probably still are a very important part of small town life. I however grew up in New York so while I was very much aware of what was going on down South with integration of the schools and other public arenas I don't think I truly understood how difficult it really was for the people to literally change over night. It was always a culture shock for me whenever I traveled with my family through the South--there were even different drinking fountains for the two races. This was a time of civil unrest in the US-political figures were being assassinated, it was the time of the late, great Martin Luther King-the Klu Klux Klan resurfaced and there were rallies both for and against integration all over the country.

At least in this novel (a work of fiction with more then a grain of facts and truth interwoven)-it was the integration of the high school which brought everyone together ultimately--because as any small town person knows--what really counts in the long run is to win the State Championship!

I truly loved this book and will be re reading it-I hope that you will take the time to purchase and read this as well-I give it a 5 Star Rating. At the moment it is only available in paperback but the e-book should be out soon.

About the Book: (from Amazon)

It’s 1968. The winds of change are descending on Fairmont and engulfing the small South Carolina town in a tornadic frenzy. The public schools are finally being completely integrated. Mossy Springs High School is closing and its black students are now attending formerly all-white Fairmont High; the town is rife with racial tension. Several black youths have been arrested for tossing firebombs at a handful of stores. White citizens form a private academy for the purpose of keeping their kids out of the integrated school system. The Ku Klux Klan is growing.

Reese Knighton arrives on the scene at precisely the right time. The principal of Fairmont High School, Claude Lowell, becomes superintendent of the school district. Lowell chooses Preston Shipley, currently the football coach, to replace him as principal and hires Knighton to coach the team, thus forcing Knighton to find common ground with Willie Spurgeon, the successful Mossy Springs coach who has been passed over for a job he richly deserves.

At The Intangibles’center is the Hoskins family, their relationships to those living within the town of Fairmont giving rise to a memorable cast of characters. Tommy Hoskins is a local businessman and farmer who is a supporter of the team, on which his older son, Frankie, plays. Frankie’s best friend is Raymond Simpson, who lives in a shanty on the Hoskins’ farm. Another of Frankie’s friends, Ned Whitesides, is a spoiled bigot. Clarence “Click” Clowney is the talented, rebellious quarterback from Mossy Springs. Al Martin is the staunch black tackle who becomes the glue that keeps the integrated team together. Twins James and Joey Leverette are the sons of professors at local Oconee College. Curly Mayhew coaches rival Lexington Central. Laura Hedison is a white cheerleader. Jorge Heredia is a tennis player at the college who sells drugs on the side. Aubrey Roper is a college girl who exerts a corruptive influence on Frankie Hoskins. The county sheriff, a turncoat within the team, Ned Whitesides’ father, the loyal assistants, militants both black and white, a doctor, a lawyer, local businessmen, and others all add fuel to the fires of prejudice and fear of the unknown that are raging in the town of Fairmont.

This is a story of a high school football team that puts aside its differences, never realizing that, outside its bounds, the world is unraveling. It’s a story about the cultural changes, good and bad, that take place when two societies shift and finally come together.

Ultimately, The Intangibles is a story of triumph achieved at considerable cost.


PURCHASE:

Paperback on Amazon

Paperback on B&N


About the Author: (from Amazon)


Monte Dutton lives in Clinton, South Carolina. In high school, he played football for a state championship team, then attended Furman University, Greenville, S.C., graduating in 1980, B.A., cum laude, political science/history.
He spent 20 years (1993-2012)wriing about NASCAR for several publications. He was named Writer of the Year by the Eastern Motorsports Press Association (Frank Blunk Award) in 2003 and Writer of the Year by the National Motorsports Press Association (George Cunningham Award) in 2008. His NASCAR writing was syndicated by King Feature Syndicate in the form of a weekly page, "NASCAR This Week" for 17 years.
Monte Dutton is also the author of Pride of Clinton, a history of high school football in his hometown, 1986; At Speed, 2000 (Potomac Books); Rebel with a Cause: A Season with NASCAR's Tony Stewart, 2001 (Potomac Books); Jeff Gordon: The Racer, 2001 (Thomas Nelson); Postcards from Pit Road, 2003 (Potomac Books); Haul A** and Turn Left, 2005 (Warner Books), True to the Roots: Americana Music Revealed, 2006. (Bison Books); and is an Editor/Contributor of Taking Stock: Life in NASCAR's Fast Lane, 2004 (Potomac Books).

The Audacity of Dope, 2011 (Neverland Publishing) was his first novel, and Neverland recently published his second, The Intangibles. Another, Crazy by Natural Causes, is in the works.

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I received a paperback copy of this book for review purposes. All opinions expressed are my own honest opinions. For more information please check my Disclosure Statement. Our giveaways are in no way sponsored or promoted by Facebook.

26 comments :

Masshole Mommy said...

Sounds like yet another great read. I also grew up in a small town and the high school football team was everything, so I can totally relate to that.

Anonymous said...

I think this sounds like a fantastic read. I'll look into picking it up. Thanks for sharing!

Melanie S said...

This sounds like a very interesting story. I'll be on the lookout for the ebook.

Aisha Kristine Chong said...

I read something similar to this - similar environment and such but an entirely different story. It brought me to that memories when I read it.

Tess said...

I also grew up in a country town. i know how the atheletes can be put up on a pedestal and treated like royalty.

Monte Dutton said...

Many thanks for the kind words. I appreciate your examination of my novel, and I'm gratified that your honesty yielded a positive impression.

AMBER EDWARDS said...

This sounds like such a fun book to read. I also grew up in a very small town and yes, Sports was all that mattered to the community. It was a bit irritating at times, but I could still relate to this book.

Casey Lindberg-Coghill said...

Lately I've been missing the small town high school where I used to teach, so maybe this book would fill the void! It sounds like the author really understands the type of ambiance about which he is writing; that's so important for truly realistic works of fiction.

Melanie B said...

I just saw this book the other day and didn't have time to check it out! Thanks for the review

Pam said...

I live in a small town and can agree, football means everything to them. My daughter won the State Literature competition and that was nothing compared to the football team going to regionals.

Jennifer Williams said...

Small or big town, sports are too important, I have a bad attitude toward that because of my past history with sports being so important in our schools we did not have books or seats - love the school system here. Anyway, the book sounds like it would be a great read, I love that it is a little fiction and non-fiction.

Annemarie said...

I am always looking for a good book to read. So the timing is perfect, I just finished my last book. I will pick up a copy thanks for the review.

marielle said...

this sounds like a really great book. great review!

Cynthia Landrie said...

Great book and a great review! We all learn lessons in life and sometimes reading a great book will help us too!

Pam said...

I grew up in the 60s but in the North. I love to read about this time period. This sounds very interesting and like a great read.

Tough Cookie Mommy said...

I love that this book has a whole sports connection. Hopefully this will attract a lot more men to read it.

Lolo @ Crazy About My Baybah said...

Sounds like a great read. I love when there are life lessons in a good book.

Liz @ A Nut in a Nutshell said...

You do a fantastic job of bringing the books to life for us to help us decide if they're right for us or not. This one is right for me!

Katherine Bartlett said...

This book has really come to life with what you've said!

Maria said...

Foot ball and small towns sounds like my life!! Sounds like a fun read for me!

BabsProjects said...

This books sound great and sure makes for a great read. I love to read books with lot of drama and history. Hopefully I will have a chance to read this one.

Ashley Gill said...

You are exactly right about small town thinking! Sports are so important!! I think my husband would enjoy this book. He loves reading sports books and has been reading a lot lately. I may order if for his kindle for him! :)

Melanie said...

Thanks for another great book review, I can always count on finding a great book when I come over for a visit.. My Book list is getting longer and longer and I'm loving it.. thanks for sharing

MELISASource said...

Oh wow this sounds like a very intriguing read. I just may have to give this one a closer look!

tony greene said...

My youngest son would love to read a book like this on sports and being part of a team.

Onica MommyFactor said...

Wow this book tackles some serious topics. Def a good read for older kids to learn more about social connections.

 
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